Mum To Mom

Musings of an Aussie Mother Living in the USA

Author: Tania (page 1 of 7)

Writing Poetry: A Success Story of a Resistant Writer

From seventh grade through to the first half of eighth, A-Age-13 has been studying poetry using Grammar of Poetry by Matt Whitling. Grammar Of PoetryThis is an excellent curriculum that teaches writing poetry through imitation. There are many writing assignments throughout the curriculum where the student, after being taught a specific trope, writes their own in the same style. Even though I have read poetry aloud to her since she could talk, A-Age-13 maintains that she hates poetry and was horrified to learn she was to write her own. Her first attempts were … interesting. Some kids have rhyme in their blood. I have a younger daughter who is constantly composing little rhymes and songs without any encouragement or expectation from me. Not so for A-Age-13. She fought against every word. She struggled to feel the rhythm or make sense of the words. But somewhere along the road, she finally accepted the requirement and resignedly wrote what was asked of her, even though she still hated it (so she says). The lesson on alliteration explained that earlier English poetry didn’t rely on rhyme, but alliteration. The assignment was to write a 30 line poem in a similar alliterative style to a passage from Beowulf. This task seemed impossible at first. But when A-Age-13 decided to break up the poem into 5 stanzas, beginning each stanza with a sense (taste, touch, sight, etc.), the task was still huge but perhaps possible. It didn’t quite reach 30 lines, and whether it imitates the style of Beowulf or not, I think this is the best poem she has written, especially because of the subject matter she chose. Not all the lines are great, but for someone so resistant to writing poetry, I’m so stinking proud of her!

Here it is for your enjoyment and edification.

 

God

The sound of silence is sweet to the ear,
Yet music surrounds the hall of the soul,
From the depths can be heard
Screams and screeches, a cacophony of noises,
And on the surface sacred symphony’s play soothing melodies to calm the soul.

The taste of sin tempts the tastebuds,
But down the path to tragedy leads,
The trustworthy Savior on the tree took our place,
A terrible price paid for our eternity
Triumphant and transcendent, by God’s right-hand He stands.

The fragrance of flowers fills the soul,
As healing from scars left by satan’s foul stench,
The faithful friend our burdens He bore,
With a fatal price, He died
For us, yet now for us, He lives.

The touch of the Father’s saving grace,
Who sent His Son the perfect life to live,
For our salvation, He died,
The fearfully faithful Father,
Gave up His son for love of us.

The sight of the sovereign God our Lord,
Surround the soul with joy,
Through the Savior, we see His glory,
Through His grace, He gives us eternity,
Glory to God in the Highest.

 

My Homeschool Vision Statement

July has been the month of planning our homeschool year (for all my Aussie peeps, the American school year usually begins around Aug/Sept). For the last week or two, I have been locked in our study surrounded by school books, spreadsheets, and checklists. I always begin the process hoping to get the majority of our year mapped out, checklists filled in, and lesson plans written for the entire year so that I have less to do from week to week. I am yet to achieve this hope, but I will have the first term completed, which is a good start. This year was different. I began the process with something that I have never done before: I wrote a homeschool vision statement. Pam Barnhill has encouraged moms for many years to begin planning with a vision statement. She even gave a webinar once about it, and I believe she teaches about it in her planning courses. This year, I finally did it.

So often, planning can become mechanical. Find the curriculum. Fill in the timeslots in your planner. Begin pre-reading the books. Make a list of materials needed. Get the materials. Familiarize yourself with the lessons. Make a note of any discussion questions, science LABS, note-booking etc. etc and put those in the lesson plans/checklists. Do all of these x4 students. The process of planning can overshadow the reason why you began to homeschool in the first place.

The planning we do at the beginning of the year can also leave us disappointed at the end of the year. The hopes we had at the beginning are barely recognizable as we limp over the finish line. The end of the last three school years have left me anxious and overwhelmed. My school year never finishes as perfectly as I want it to. My children struggled in certain areas so that they didn’t make as much progress as I had planned. There were areas where our homeschool did not reflect the ideal atmosphere and philosophy that I so often write about here. We didn’t check all of the boxes. I dropped the ball on dictation, memory work, and (fill-in-the-blank). My kids didn’t do all the extra-curricular activities that I see my friends’ kids doing. I must have failed them. Somewhere in the middle of the year I lose sight of my reasons and hopes for homeschool and become overwhelmed with all the things. Maybe this is just a reflection of my own personality and the tension I feel between the ideal and the real, but this is how it has gone for me every year.

I knew that to begin planning this coming school year in this state of mind was not a good place to start. I needed to remember why I chose to homeschool before I even thought about filling in checklists. This drove me to prayer. I have prayed for specific areas of my children’s education before, mostly the areas of struggle, as well as my own keenly felt limitations in teaching my kids, but I have never prayed for our homeschool generally, or planning, itself. I have never begun my planning with prayer. Let me tell you, prayer changes everything. It is an acknowledgment that you have limitations and that you need help from our omnipotent, ever-present God. It is an acknowledgment of God’s sovereignty over all things, including our well-laid plans. As I have come to realize, my well-laid plans do not always turn out the way I want them to. But our year has been exactly what God intended. “The heart of man plans his way, but the LORD establishes his steps.” (Proverbs 16:9) God’s plans always work out. And they are for our good and His glory. This month, I have prayed constantly for every child, every subject, every checklist. Not because prayer is a magic potion that will make our homeschool perfect, but because I need God. None of it is meaningful without acknowledging Him as being at the center of it all and that He is trustworthy and faithful to do His will in our homeschool.

After much prayer, I wrote my vision statement. I printed this out and put it in the front of my homeschool binder. I want to always have it right in front of me. Every time I open my binder to do the next lesson, my vision is before me. When difficulties come along, when a shiny new curriculum makes me doubt what we are currently doing and tempt me to throw it all away and start again, when my plans seem to fall apart at the seams, I can remember why we are doing what we are doing. I can hold fast to these principles that will withstand all the bends and curves of life, trust God, and press on. In addition to my vision statement, I also took the time to write specific goals for each of my kids that I keep in front of me as I make plans for their school year. These include specific subjects and skills, weaknesses and strengths that I want to focus on for each child this coming year. This meant taking a reality check on what was the priority for each child this year. Even though I wish I were, I am not Wonder Woman, and I cannot give focused attention on every area, for every child, all the time. Writing goals for each of my children helped me to see where my time is best spent with each child. I will not share my goals for my children with you since they are personal, but here is my homeschool vision statement for 2019/2020. I encourage you to think about writing one for yourself. If you already have one, what has been the benefit to you? What have you learned from it? Has it changed? I’d love to hear from you.

Vision Statement

I want my children to love and worship the one true God, pursue holiness, dwell on what is true, seek what is good, love what is lovely, and do what is right with all diligence and perseverance in order that they may glorify God and enjoy Him forever.

I want my children to desire wisdom and knowledge and develop the skills to pursue knowledge and wisdom for themselves.

The knowledge that I desire my children to know, delight in, and pursue is the knowledge of God, the knowledge of man, and the knowledge of the universe. The delight for this knowledge is most readily cultivated through living books. The supreme living book being the Bible.

I want my children to learn to think for themselves and be able to articulate their thoughts and ideas clearly in both oral and written forms.

I want them to learn the reading, writing, math, and thinking skills necessary to participate and contribute in society as godly, patriotic, and useful citizens.

The Discipline of Habit – Part 2

square_white_habits2

A Journey Through Charlotte Mason’s 20 Principles: Principle 5b & 7 – Part 2

Therefore, we are limited to three educational instruments – [the second being] the discipline of habit…
By “education is a discipline,” we mean the discipline of habits, formed definitely and thoughtfully, whether habits of mind or body. Physiologists tell us of the adaptation of brain structures to habitual lines of thought, i.e. to our habits.

You do not have to search far on the internet or in bookstores to find helpful advice in ways to develop habits. In fact, I highly recommend Atomic Habits by James Clear as a very practical and research-based method of developing habits. In my last post, I discussed Mason’s “why” and “what” of habit training. If you haven’t read it, I highly recommend that you do before you read on. Today I am discussing “how.” Since this is part of my study of Charlotte Mason’s 20 principles, I am choosing to limit this discussion to what stood out to me from what she said. It is by no means comprehensive but a very good starting place for a mother to think about how to train her children in the habits discussed in my previous post.

Begin with the person

Habit training begins with Mason’s first principle, “Children are born persons.” They have desires and affections, conscience and a sense of duty, just as we do. They have both physical and intellectual characteristics and skills that are inherited or learned through family culture. They are particular ages with strengths and weaknesses. We take who they are as a person into account first. Then…

Teach them to do what is right

“…[it is] as much the parent’s duty to educate his child into moral strength and purpose and intellectual activity as it is to feed him and clothe him; and that in spite of his nature, if it must be so.” Vol 1, p103

Considering a child’s age, abilities, and dispositions, children are often not capable or naturally inclined to compel themselves at first to do and think the right thing. They need us to show them the way first, require them to do what is right, and lead them toward right thinking and doing for themselves as they grow in maturity.

“He depends upon his parents; it rests with them to initiate the thoughts he shall think, the desires he shall cherish, the feelings he shall allow. Only to initiate; no more is permitted to them; but from this initiation will result the habits of thought and feeling which govern the man––his character, that is to say.”

As mothers, there are many ways that we already naturally do this. We see the sins, flaws, and vices of our children and we take pains to correct and educate them in right behavior to replace the wrong. For example, it is often automatic for a mother to tell a child, “say please” before giving them something that they have asked for, and “say thank you” when they have received it. Then, when they have learned the required responses (habits of manners), we no longer prompt them with “say please.” Instead, we ask, “what do you say?” requiring them to think and remember for themselves what the required way of asking for something is. Once we have proceeded with this for a short while, we then do not need to prompt with words at all. We simply withhold that which the child has asked for until they have remembered to ask with the required “please” and responded equally to the receiving of the thing with the required “thank you.” This is very natural for a mother to do. The training of manners becomes a habit and part of the atmosphere of the home.

Reduce the strain of decision

“The effort of decision, we have seen, is the greatest effort of life; not the doing of the thing, but the making up of one’s mind as to which thing to do first.”p119

When we show the children that we expect a certain behavior every time, we take the decision making out of the equation. For example, if we want them to develop a habit of making their bed in the morning, we must take the decision away from the children whether or not they will choose to make their bed in the morning. There is no choice. They must. It is required. That is it. No more discussion. I find checklists especially invaluable for this kind of training in habits of cleanliness, neatness, and order around the home. This dovetails nicely with James Clear’s third principle of behavior change: Make it easy. “You just need to get your reps in.” (Atomic Habits, p143) By removing the effort of decision and requiring a certain behavior everyday, you are helping the children practice a behavior which becomes an automatic habit.

“Here, no doubt, come in the functions of parents and teachers; they should be able to make the child do that which he lacks the power to compel himself to. But it were poor training that should keep the child dependent upon personal influence. It is the business of education to find some way of supplementing that weakness of will which is the bane of most of us as well as of the children.” Vol 1, p99-100

Expect them to do it for themselves

Mason touches on this idea over and over and over again. We train our children with the expectation that they can and should do it for themselves. This is true in math as much as it is true in learning to make themselves a nutritious lunch. Our family motto has become “never do for a child what they can do for themselves.” If Mason herself didn’t say it, the idea is firmly rooted in this principle of training children to do the work of learning for themselves.

Once a habit is established, don’t allow it to slide.

The critical moment is after a habit is established -— you might be tempted to let him off “this once. He is tired.” But this undoes everything. It teaches them to think that it’s not important.

I had a friend tell me a few weeks ago that her daughter’s track coach cautioned the team not to ease up on running over the summer break. They were to keep it up because the coach was aware of research that showed that when a physical habit, such as running, is relaxed to the point where they miss more than a week, their physical ability reverts back further than where they were when they first started. This is especially true for girls and running. To allow the relaxing of a habit will undo all the hard work of establishing the habit in the first place and may set you back even further.

It is important to remember that it doesn’t take the same amount of work to maintain a habit once established as it does to form it in the first place. It requires diligence to stay on top of it but nowhere near the same effort to maintain it. Think about your habit of brushing your teeth. When you were a 3-year-old learning to brush your teeth every day, it required all your will power plus the insistence of Mom, to brush your teeth well every day. But now that you are an adult and this habit is firmly entrenched, you no longer exert any of the energy you first did. It is now so automatic you barely think about it at all. This is true for our children as well.

Here are the steps again.

General steps to form a habit

1. Teach it.
2. Look with expectancy that they can do it. Say little and allow the child to do their own work of thinking through the steps.
3. After 2-3 weeks the habit should be formed.
4. Do not allow dawdling to come back in at this point. New brain pathways have been forged and to go back on them at this point would undo the habit forming.

When is a habit successful?

“The education of habit is successful in so far as it enables the mother to let her children alone, not teasing them with perpetual commands and directions––a running fire of Do and Don’t; but letting them go their own way and grow, having first secured that they will go the right way, and grow to fruitful purpose.” Vol 1, p134

We train them in habits first by instructing them in the way of the habit, then let them think of it and do it for themselves. Once they know how, they need to think through the steps themselves and then do them. Resist the urge to prod them for each step. Otherwise, you are training them to rely on your memory, rather than their own. If they really can’t remember then, of course, help them. But always toward the purpose of having them learn and do it for themselves.

Developing specific habits pertaining to their education

Habit of thinking

  • Give them the right sort of lessons — Give them books!

“We need not labour to get children to learn their lessons; that, if we would believe it, is a matter which nature takes care of. Let the lessons be of the right sort and children will learn them with delight.” Vol 6, p99

James Clear says that the second law of behavior change is “make it attractive.” Mason is essentially saying the same thing. Make the lessons delightful. Mason believed that rich meaty ideas through well-written living books of a narrative nature are the feast that is naturally engaging and delightful to the minds of children. Ideas are stimulating food for the mind and will grow their thinking muscle.

  • Sow the idea lightly and casually — Give them books!

“It is possible to sow a great idea lightly and casually and perhaps this sort of sowing should be rare and casual because if a child detect a definite purpose in his mentor he is apt to stiffen himself against it.”p102

Mason says the best way is to give the children great books with heroes of good character from which to train habits of right thinking that, over time, give rise in the children’s minds to gain the same opinion.

In Atomic Habits, James Clear talks about identity as the deepest aspect of behavior change. How you identify yourself, what you believe about yourself, has a deep impact on what you do. It is the difference between thinking, “I try to run” compared with, “I am a runner.” The person who identifies as being a runner will be more motivated to run every day than someone who just tries to run. How we identify ourselves matters. As we give living books to our children that contain ideas of honor, nobleness, compassion, faithfulness, etc. the hope is that our children will take these ideas as their own—that these ideas will become part of their identity. In other words, that virtuous ideas become part of their habit of thinking which, Lord willing, will result in good doing.

When E-age-10 (at the time) and I read about the life of Teddy Roosevelt, we were astounded at the boundless energy, the zest for life, and the sheer amount of activity he fit into any given day. Whatever you think about his politics, the ideas of working hard and using your time wisely that came out through this book have not been lost on my daughter. They continue to work, albeit under the surface, to form her habits of thinking virtuously which, Lord willing, will produce good doing.

“We have seen the value of habit in mind and morals, religion and physical development. It is as we have seen disastrous when child or man learns to think in a groove, and shivers like an unaccustomed bather on the steps of a new notion. This danger is perhaps averted by giving children as their daily diet the wise thoughts of great minds, and of many great minds; so that they may gradually and unconsciously get the courage of their opinions. If we fail in this duty, so soon as the young people get their ‘liberty’ they will run after the first fad that presents itself; try it for a while and then take up another to be discarded in its turn, and remain uncertain and ill-guided for the rest of their days.”p104

Habit of attention

The habit of attention is giving complete attention of our minds to what it should be on at a given time so that we can know it and recollect it later. If you have ever experienced your mind wondering off when it should be listening to a sermon (or to your husband!), or giving it’s full attention to the book that you are reading, or writing a paper, you know that it requires rigorous effort of will to stay focused and give full attention to what it is you are doing. To train the habit of attention in our children now will be of great value to them, not just during their education, but in all of life.

“‘habit is ten natures,’ and we can all imagine how our work would be eased if our subordinates listened to instructions with the full attention which implies recollection” Vol 6, p 100

Steps to training habit of attention (from Vol 1, p137-148)

  •  Definite work in a definite time. – (Mason says 20 minutes for a child under 8) One time is not ‘as good as another.’ When it is time for math, that is what must be given complete attention for the full amount of time. Do not allow daydreaming or a wondering mind. This works in combination with…
  • Short lessons – Don’t let the time for the lesson go longer than a child can keep their full attention. Mason says 20 minutes for a child under 8. Sometimes, when my children first began formal lessons, or when a new concept is particularly hard, they have needed a shorter lesson time than even this. I gradually built up the time over a few weeks as they were able to give full attention for longer. “When a child grows stupid over a lesson, it is time to put it away” vol 1, p141. This helps to strengthen the habit of attention rather than give them the opportunity to develop the habit of inattention by daydreaming. (Full disclosure – I have one child that is a daydreamer by nature. This is an area we are STILL working on. Studying this principle has shown me that I need to be extra diligent in addressing the habit of attention for this child. Educating is for the long haul, mamas. Don’t grow weary of doing good.)
  • Alternating lessons. sums first, say, while the brain is quite fresh; then writing, or reading––some more or less mechanical exercise, by way of a rest; and so on, the program varying a little from day to day, but the same principle throughout––a ‘thinking’ lesson first, and a ‘painstaking’ lesson to follow,––the child gets through his morning lessons without any sign of weariness.”(Vol 1, p142)
    This is also the antidote to weariness in a lesson. If your child grows “stupid” over a lesson before you have finished the allotted time, put it away and do something completely different. Then go back to it when “wits are refreshened.”
  • Use Natural Rewards.––”What is the natural consequence of work well and quickly done? Is it not the enjoyment of ampler leisure?”p143 Assign an amount of work in a given time. If they get it done early, the rest of the lesson time is theirs. My children usually choose to go onto the next lesson and accumulate their free time for the end of the school day, while others will choose to use the spare minutes straight away to do something they enjoy at the time.
  • Natural Reward for the older child. — When an older child is taught to bring “ his own will to bear; to make himself attend in spite of the most inviting suggestions from without,” he should be taught to feel satisfaction and triumph in fixing his thoughts on what he ought.
  • Use Natural Consequences — If a child does not give full attention to his work and does not complete definite work in a reasonably given amount of time, a natural consequence could be that he loses his free time at the end of the school day to complete the work he should have already completed due to lack of attention. This may mean that the extracurricular activity scheduled for the end of the day will have to be missed because the child did not give the attention he ought to have during class time. It would not take very long for a child to see the wisdom of definite work in a definite time :).

If you’d like to join me in studying Charlotte Mason’s 20 Principles, get your copy of Start Here and see this post for details

A Journey Through Charlotte Mason 20 Principles Directory

The Discipline of Habit – Part 1

Habits photo

A Journey Through Charlotte Mason’s 20 Principles: Principle 5b & 7 – Part 1

Therefore, we are limited to three educational instruments – [the second being] the discipline of habit…
By “education is a discipline,” we mean the discipline of habits, formed definitely and thoughtfully, whether habits of mind or body. Physiologists tell us of the adaptation of brain structures to habitual lines of thought, i.e. to our habits.

There is so much to be said in the area of habits. In fact, Charlotte Mason herself said a lot. There was a LOT of reading for this principle, y’all! In order to unpack it in a way that was helpful to me, I organized the ideas into three different questions. Why is the idea of the discipline of habit important in education? What did Mason consider were the habits of the mind and the body? How do we initiate the formation of these habits in our homes? For the sake of length, this post will be concerned with the first two questions. The ‘how’ will be addressed in a separate post.

Why is the idea of the discipline of habit important in education?

1. It makes life easier

“But the most comfortable thing in this view of habit is, that it falls in with our natural love of an easy life. We are not unwilling to make efforts in the beginning with the assurance that by-and-by things will go smoothly; and this is just what habit is, in an extraordinary degree, pledged to effect.” Vol 1, p136

This is the most obvious and well-known reason for the establishment of habits. A plethora of self-help and productivity books have been written about habits with this purpose in mind. As Mason points out, our natural desire is to make life easier. Decision fatigue is a real thing which Mason discusses at length. She describes the strain that making a lot of decisions can have on a person. It is a burden which can easily become too much to bear. Imagine needing to make the decision every morning to get out of bed, to brush your teeth, to eat your meals, to brush your hair. For most of us, we don’t have to make the decision to do these things every day. We just do them out of habit. No mental energy has been expended to complete our morning routine and get ready for the day. We just do it. Habits take the decision out of what is to be done next. As Mystie Winkler often says, just do the right next thing.

Mason explains that we want the children to do the work of learning for themselves. Developing habits of mind and body is the best way to help them take ownership of their work, know the right next thing to do, and avoid the strain of making decisions about what the right thing to do is.

2. Habits are inevitable
Mason points out that our very natures prove that habits will form whether we purposely instill them or not. The question is, will they be good habits or bad? More often than not, left to ourselves, without any purposeful action toward establishing right habits, we will tend to establish unhelpful bad habits, naturally seeking the ease of life rather than the work of a good life. Therefore, establishing right habits is all the more important in the education of our children.

“We have lost sight of the fact that habit is to life what rails are to transport cars. It follows that lines of habit must be laid down towards given ends and after careful survey, or the joltings and delays of life become insupportable. More, habit is inevitable. If we fail to ease life by laying down habits of right thinking and right acting, habits of wrong thinking and wrong acting fix themselves of their own accord.” Vol 6, P101

3. Brain science tells us that habits restructure the brain.
Mason was greatly impressed with new brain research showing that pathways in the brain are rewired through habitual activity. The latest habit book I have read, Atomic Habits, also refers to current studies on the power of habits to the brain.

“We all know something of the genesis of a habit, and most of us recognise its physical basis, i.e. that frequently-repeated thoughts or acts leave some sort of register in the brain tissue which tends to make the repetition of such thoughts, at first easy, and at last automatic.”vol 3, p105

4. Establishes tools for good living in adulthood.
“training in habit becomes a habit.” (Vol 1, p126)

By initiating habits in the home, you not only equip your children with good, intentional, and thorough habits for the time they live in your home, you also give them the tools to continue to develop their own good habits of mind and body into the rest of their lives.

“habit is like fire, a bad master but an indispensable servant;” Vol 6, p101

5. Reinforces the idea of authority.
This idea is developed by Mason in Volume 3, when she talks about the training of physical habits. She says that through physical training, the idea of “living under authority, training under authority, serving under authority” (Vol 3, p103) can be brought to bear. Through habit a person is taught to bring their body into subjection first to his parents, then to his own will, and always under the authority of God. (I discussed the idea of authority in this post and this post.)

6. Prepares for a life of service
The training in habits prepares the children to be fit for whatever plans God has for them. Mason explains that the Greeks disciplined their bodies so that they were prepared for any heroic feats that the ‘gods’ would ask of them. How much more should our children, who we raise to serve the living true God, develop habits of mind and body in order that they would be prepared to serve Him in whatever capacity He places them. It prepares them to love their neighbor.

“we are empirically certain that a chief function of education is the establishment of such ways of thinking in children as shall issue in good and useful living, clear thinking, aesthetic enjoyment, and, above all, in the religious life.” – Vol 6, p100

What are the Habits of the Mind?

1. Habit of Attention
“You want them to remember? Then secure his whole attention.” (Vol 1, p157)

The development of the habit of attention is a significant aspect of Mason’s philosophy of education. She believed it was so important to develop the habit of fixing a child’s thoughts completely on what it should be on at that moment.

“no intellectual habit is so valuable as that of attention; it is a mere habit but it is also the hall-mark of an educated person.” Vol 6, p99

“A vigorous effort of will should enable us at any time to fix our thoughts.” (Vol 1, p137) A person’s capacity for mental effort is reduced when allowed to wonder off or day dream. Mason believed that overpressure or burn out was a result of a failure of the habit of attention. The children are so overly distracted that the lesson becomes overburdensome for lack of attention. She had much to say about how this habit should be developed which I hope to discuss in the next post.

2. Religious Life
Mason discusses the benefit of requiring participation in liturgy and religious habits. It encourages the religious life to be “fixed and delightful and give us due support in the effort to live a godly, righteous and sober life.” (Vol 6, p103) I do not remember reading Mason outlining religious habits specifically in the readings for this principle, but we can assume she means prayer, Scripture reading, and worship.

3. Thinking
This is the development of right thinking that results in right living. It can be seen as synonymous with ‘wisdom and knowledge’ so often referred to in the Bible. It is clear thinking that asks and attempts to answer their own questions. “Every walk should offer some knotty problem for the children to think out.” (Vol 1, p194) It is the development of tracing effect from cause, or cause from effect, comparing alike and different, and drawing conclusions as to causes or consequences from certain premises.

4. Morals
Although this is not a comprehensive list, Mason draws specific attention to obedience, “obedience the whole duty of a child” (Vol 1, p161) as well as sense of honor, gentleness, kindness, candor, respect, truthfulness, temper (keeping his temper).

Other habits of the mind briefly mentioned to work on in the education of children were concentration, thoroughness, intellectual volition, accuracy, reflection, remembering, and meditation.

As we consider these habits of the mind, Mason warns parents to be careful to not look to:

“‘What will people say? what will people think? how will it look?’ [so that] the children grow up with habits of seeming, and not of being; they are content to appear well-dressed, well-mannered, and well-intentioned to outsiders, with very little effort after beauty, order, and goodness at home, and in each other’s eyes.” Vol 1, p106

What are the habits of the body?

1. Cleanliness, Neatness, and Order
After the children have been allowed to enjoy all the messy play that is foundational to childhood, Mason impresses the importance of training them to be anxious to clean themselves of any dirt from play, bathe themselves daily, and tidy and restore order to any messes they have made. All things to be put away in their place. She stresses the importance of having the children clean up for themselves. “The pleasure grown-up people take in waiting on children is really a fruitful source of mischief.” (Vol 1, p127)

2. Manners, elocution, music, singing, health, and physical fitness
These physical skills that Mason also identified should not require much explanation. These skills are improved and made easier through repetition. That is, through habit. The benefits of developing habits in these areas for the individual are discussed in books and blog posts all over the internet. But the highest benefit, as has already been discussed earlier in this post, is to glorify God and to love and serve others with our bodies.

Mason also identifies that physical activity such as playing on the field also helps to develop habits that she calls half physical and half moral. That is, habits of good character that develop through both habits of mind and body. These are:

1. Self-restraint – no overindulgence of food or activities. Also, the habit of restraining discontentedness as well as idleness.
2. Self-control – being “impervious to small annoyances.” That is, practicing the habit of self-control of emotional outbursts, “cheerful under small inconveniences” and ready for action with “presence of mind.” Self-control results in having mind and emotions in submission to your will so that you can act and respond reasonably in a given situation.
3. Self-discipline – In behavior, address, courtesy, deportment (conduct), tones of voice, tidying own messes.
4. Alertness – that is, developing the habit of alertness to seize opportunities of getting knowledge.
5. Quick perception.
6. Fortitude – to bear pain and inconvenience without making a sign.
7. Others – stimulating ideas, service, prudence, courage, and chastity.

This is a formidable list of habits that may seem overwhelming. You might, as I do, see a vast array of habits that you, yourself, need to work on, let alone train your children in. Mason herself acknowledges that forming habits requires certain “strenuousness.” As a mom of four, if I were to try to work on all of these at one time, this list would be unattainable. There are practical things we can do to help develop these habits for ourselves as well as our children which I will discuss in the next post, but as Cindy Rollins often says, we are in this for the “long haul.” We need to keep in mind that we will not always see results in the immediate future. These habits develop little by little over the many years that the children are with us, as part of the atmosphere of our homes. We need to allow ourselves grace to work on what is possible with much prayer and supplication, and leave the rest. We need to remember to lean not on our own strength but on the Lord’s. We can rest in the knowledge that God is faithful. He never slumbers nor sleeps and is working in us and in our children even when we are exhausted and do no more. We can trust in the knowledge that “we do not labor in the dark.” (Vol 3, p99) We do not labor in vain.

My help comes from the Lord,
who made heaven and earth.
He will not let your foot be moved;
he who keeps you will not slumber.
Behold, he who keeps Israel
will neither slumber nor sleep.
* Psalm 121:2-4

If you’d like to join me in studying Charlotte Mason’s 20 Principles, get your copy of Start Here and see this post for details

A Journey Through Charlotte Mason 20 Principles Directory

Four Truths to Highlight When Reading Leviticus in Morning Time

For the last seven years, we have read the Bible in Morning Time. We alternate between reading the New Testament on one day and reading the Old Testament the next. In the New Testament, we have made our way through the Gospels, Acts, and cycled back again to complete Matthew for a second time. In the Old Testament we have read Genesis and Exodus twice, and Joshua through 2 Kings once. I have chosen to stay with narratives for the time being since my youngest is only 5.

Earlier this year, when we finished Exodus for the second time, I had a choice. I either skip the rest of the Law again (Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy) or continue on and read the very next book in the Bible, Leviticus. Leviticus isn’t known for its captivating narrative. There was a real possibility that my kids, aged 5, 9, 10, and 12, would become exasperated with all of the ceremonial laws, sacrifices, blood, and acacia wood. Believing that “ALL Scripture is living and active” (Heb. 4:12) and “breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness,” (2 Tim. 3:16) I continued on, praying that God’s Word would work in our hearts and “not return to [us] void.” (Isa 55:11)

God is so faithful. Even though my kids will probably tell you that Leviticus was boring and confusing, God’s Word did not return void. We learned and grew in our faith together. We were encouraged in the gospel. At the end of this post, I have included a narration of one of my children answering a question about our Bible reading in her end-of-year exam. I found it so encouraging to hear, in her own words, what she took away from reading Leviticus.

But first, here are some big picture ideas that I kept in mind and drew to my children’s attention as we made our way through Leviticus. I hope that it encourages you to read some of the lesser read books of the Bible with your kids. Just keep in mind their ages. I never attempted to read this book when all my kids were little. It is also worth noting that given their ages, I skipped the descriptive passages about sexual sin.

1. It shows us who God is: God is holy

The book of Leviticus outlines to the Israelites a multitude of specific sins that must be atoned for. It also outlines what must be done when the Israelites didn’t sin but became unclean through a skin blemish or some other means. The fact that God is so specific about sins and how they were to be atoned for demonstrates how holy God is. Even a blemish on the skin needed to be dealt with appropriately before the Israelites could come into the presence of God. That is how pure and righteous and holy God is.

2. It shows us who we are: We are sinners

The book of Leviticus was written for God’s chosen people, the Israelites, to set them apart as God’s people and to show them how to live rightly as the people of God. Because God is holy, He set out very specific laws for right living. When those laws are broken, it is sin. Those who sin are guilty. The fact that this book explains so many kinds of sins and the very specific way they must be atoned for shows that God knew that the Israelites would sin. And sin regularly. Like the Israelites, we are sinners. We are guilty.

3. It shows us that our sin and guilt must be punished or atoned for

God is so Holy that no sin can be in His presence. Therefore sin must be punished or atoned for — all sin. Only the blood of a sacrifice will satisfy justice and the breaking of God’s law. The Israelites needed to be made right with God and their sins atoned for in order for God to dwell in their midst. We too must have our sins atoned for and made right with God.

4. It points us to Christ: Christ fulfilled the law

Since God is holy and we are sinners who have broken God’s law, we need our sins forgiven, just as the Israelites did. The sacrificial system of the Old Testament was a shadow pointing to the complete fulfillment of the law in Christ. Christ is our sacrifice. Not only did He shed His blood on the cross just as the animal’s blood was shed on the altar of the tabernacle, He also became the scapegoat for our guilt. The guilt of our sin was placed on Him. Christ’s sacrifice was perfect because He was perfect. He was without blemish. He had no sin. His sacrifice was once and for all. No longer do sacrifices need to be made year in and year out. Christ finished the work of atonement on the cross for all who believe in Him. He rose from the dead, defeating the consequence of sin—death. Through Him, we can now have our sins forgiven and dwell in the presence of God forever. We need only repent of our sins and believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God and our Savior.

Narration from Bible Exam (Age 10)

1. Describe the sin offering or the guilt offering in Leviticus. How does this relate to the gospel?

The guilt offering is where you get an animal – I can’t quite remember what it is. It’s either a goat or a bird – But you get the goat or a bird, I think it’s a goat, where you put your hands on the goat, the high priests would do that, and he would be putting all of the peoples’ sins onto that goat and they would take the goat and pull out its fat and roast it. And it was for, like, a smell. Because in one of the metaphors sin is like a stinky, horrible smell that we just put in God’s nose. So when we put that nice smell, (hmmm it reminds me of bacon and steak, it’s really good), it’s like covering, not covering, it’s taking away the bad smell.

And how the sacrifice relates to Jesus and the gospel is that He was the final sacrifice—when He died on the cross He was the final sacrifice. We do not have to do sacrifices anymore because Jesus took all the sins, even the sins we haven’t done, and even the sins we’re going to do in a year from now, He has forgiven us and taken all the sins on Him, all the punishments. He was slain, stricken, and smitten and afflicted, and God turned His back on Jesus. He turns His face to us instead of His son because He took all the sin and now we are holy and Jesus died. But God’s plan was that on the third day He would rise again from the dead and would sitteth at the right hand of God the Father Almighty and from thenceforth we will be judged as the quick and the dead. And if we don’t repent from our sins you will be put in hell which is the most baddest place ever. It’s a place where it’s dark and it’s fire. You can hear people screaming and it’s like the worst nightmare you’ve ever had and because it’s a nightmare you know it will never come to the end. And that’s the punishment from God. Even Satan does not rule over hell. He will be there. He will be the prince of darkness living in this horrible place for everlasting to everlasting and it will never end. But if you repent of your sins then you shall go in heaven where all your, if you have like a broken arm or a knee, they will be healed. There will be no sicknesses, no sins, and you will be living a perfect life worshipping God—the God of all gods and the King of all kings.

Even though the goats didn’t rise again from the dead because they had to keep making it over and over, Jesus was the last sacrifice so to beat death He had to rise again from the dead.

Note: These thoughts are a layman’s understanding of Scripture. Also, the narration is an unedited transcript of a ten-year-old’s answer.

2018/2019 End-of-Year Round Up

Last year, I began the tradition of interviewing my kids about how they felt about their school year. This year my girls finished 4th, 5th, and 7th grade using Ambleside Online’s Years 4, 5, and 7. These are their reflections followed by my own.

G-Age-9(AO4)

Favorite subjects/books
My favorite books are Kidnapped, Incredible Journey, the Roman gods one (Age Of Fable) and George Washington’s World. And George Washington is my favorite subject.

Area that I grew the most in this year
Cursive and reading, but mostly cursive.

Area I need to work on the most
Spelling.

The most interesting topic in history
George Washington. He saved America.

The most interesting topic in science
The submarine.

What was the hardest thing this year?
Reading and spelling and math.

Is there anything that you would change or add?
I would add breaks in between hard things. I think I might change it to Morning Time first and math would go after the first reading. And all the hard things would go after a reading, and then a reading would go after the hard thing. Like, reading, math, reading, cursive… (this is already how we typically structure our day. She wants the first hard thing we do to be Math instead of cursive like it was this year).

Things that you felt did not go well in our homeschool this year
I thought that Nessy was horrible (reading curriculum), math was exhausting, and that Abigail Adams and Inventions (The Story of Inventions) was just a really hard book to read and understand. And I partially did typing but I stopped.

Any supplies you wish you had
A drawing kit with erasers, sharpener, pencils, pastels, maybe some markers. And maybe the hard paper-the watercolor paper, and a sleeping mask and a pair of slippers that fit me.

Anything else
On the good days, it’s fine. On the bad days when I haven’t had good sleep, it is stressful and I don’t do good at narrating.

Best part of your homeschool day
I think Morning Time and spending time with my parents.

I am most proud of
My narrations.

I am pretty good at
Liking the books Mom reads to me.

Next year I hope to
Be better at reading.

E-Age-10(AO5)

Favorite subjects/books
Math and doing the readings. Sometimes I like to write the copywork because it’s fun to write. My favorite books are George Washington Carver, Oliver Twist, Theodore Roosevelt (Carry a Big Stick), and the inventions book (The Story of Inventions). I like history. I liked The Story of the World and This Country of Ours and I also liked Of Courage Undaunted and Kim. So I basically liked all my books. But my favorite books is like, a little bit from every history book, Oliver Twist, Theodore Roosevelt, and Inventions. I like them because they are interesting. If they weren’t interesting I probably wouldn’t pay attention as much.

Area that I grew the most in this year
Math and history. History of all the presidents I get to write down on the timeline. And so probably, in other years, when I’m a grown up and teach my kids I could just go back, look at mine, and show them as an example of what I did, so they would want to do what I did. And then they will be able to do their children if they have kids. So you can just look back and see all the work you’ve done and you just get proud of it.

Area I need to work on the most
Concentration. I wander off and think of other things like my favorite TV show and I don’t pay attention that much and so I miss the main of the story. I also need to practice learning math. Even though it is quite easy, I just get lazy and then I have to do math in the summer, even though it’s a school break, because I got lazy in the middle of the year and I did less math and so now I have to pay the consequences.

The most interesting topic in history
How all the presidents… and how the President, Thomas Jefferson sent people down to see how big America was. And it was BIG. And they actually made friends with a lot of Indians. And Thomas Jefferson was wise. He said, “If you can’t make friends with the Indians, stop and don’t go on any further, because we don’t want a war with any Indians.”

The most interesting topic in science
The parts of the body. I like to know how it’s made because, if you don’t know how your body is made, it’s like using a machine but you don’t know how it works. Because if you’re a doctor, you need to know what to do … [a lot of examples omitted for length]. I also liked Inventions. They are a little bit history but also science.

Is there anything that you would change or add?
No.

Things that you felt did not go well in our homeschool this year
I think we should have been constant reading the bible and doing Morning Time every day. Because sometimes we’d forget. And the things that didn’t go well is that I would always finish it very quickly because it would be easy and fun. I would start off school really early but then for most of the day I didn’t have anything to do so I grew bored and needed more school.

Anything else
To make things fun even though it’s hard. Make like a fun project. Like, if you’re learning math and it’s a hard question, you could just, “how many questions can you do in this time?” Or if that does not help me, you could say, “well, just do this section of math questions.” And once I’ve finished that section I would be like, “yay, I’ve finished.” You can be like, “how about you do a little bit more.” And then I can get all the math done. Or you can separate it into sections… like I do when I tidy my room.

Any supplies you wish you had
More knowledge and wisdom and to learn to control my temper when I get frustrated that I can’t work out the question of math.

Best part of your homeschool day
The readings and being satisfied that I have actually learned something.

I am most proud of
That I can understand math and I can understand my history and read it well. And learning the science about the body. So I have all this knowledge. And I am proud that I have a great mother who can teach me things. And that I write down the president’s names and it just helps me memorize them.

I am pretty good at
Reading. Because Mom taught me in a fun way.

Next year I hope to
Improve of my concentration and to help to understand the math and not think of other things while I’m reading. I just hope I can get the things done and won’t have to be slack in math so I won’t have to do it in the summer.

A-Age-12(AO7)

Favorite subjects/books
My favorite book I read this year wasn’t a school book. It was David Copperfield. It was really fun and enjoyable and you got to learn about the characters. They showed different parts of human personalities and different people and it was really fun.

My favorite school book this year… I had a lot of favorites. I liked Fallacy Detective, How To Be Your Own Selfish Pig, Freedom (In Freedom’s Cause), The Brendan Voyage, and a lot of others that I can’t remember the names of.

I liked Selfish Pig because it was funny but also told you how not to be and it had really funny and true descriptions of people who had stopped being a selfish pig. I liked Freedom because I had never really understood that part of history and through the main character, Archie, I was able to understand that. Brendan Voyage was just enjoyable.

Area that I grew the most in this year
Math. Because I worked really really hard on it so I wouldn’t fail the Stanford 10.

Area I need to work on the most
Math.

The most interesting topic in history
War of the Roses because it’s very, very complicated. And if you don’t understand exactly which side is coming from you can be unjustly biased. I still don’t quite understand everything and there are also some really complicated parts where some people don’t do anything, which doesn’t make any sense. And it’s really interesting and people can probably justify themselves pretty logically from being on either side, even though there is only one right side, and that’s the Yorkist. Which, by the way, I am.

The most interesting topic in science
The laws of this world (The Secrets of The Universe). Like the Law of Acceleration. It’s kind of cool.

The best part of our homeschool day
When I get to read my literature and history books because they’re often classics. Or if they’re not classics they are really well written, interesting books that teach you along the way. I like being able to read books and learn and not just have some boring textbook tell me something.

Is there anything that you would change or add?
Figure out some way for me to magically get better at all the hard things. Other than that it’s really helpful that I have a checklist and can just change it to fit the day and what’s happening. So there is not really anything I would like to change.

Things that you felt did not go well in our homeschool this year
Not starting on time. Which then derailed our day which then put us later in the afternoon which then got it all stressful. Then I was grumpy and then other people were grumpy, and we made each other grumpy because we were grumpy and then it just didn’t turn out very well. But that was only a couple of days.

Any supplies you wish you had
There isn’t really any supplies I need. I just need patience because I have everything I need to make my notebooks pretty, but I just need the patience to get it done. At the end of the project I’m like, “yes, this was worth it. It was worthwhile.” But then at the beginning, I’m like, “this is pointless. Why would I do this?” And then halfway through the year, I change my mood, but I have to actually start to get to that halfway point.

I am most proud of
Math because I worked really really hard and I got it all done. I was able to get better at it.

I am pretty good at
I am pretty good at reading and spelling and history and literature and logic. The only subjects I have the most trouble with are Math and Science and Chemistry, which is kind of the same thing.

Next year I hope to
Next year I hope to be done with King Arthur. Because I am sick of it.

Anything else
There is nothing I would like to add because it is fine. Really, really, really, really enjoyable. I think the only feedback I could give wouldn’t be to you, it would be to me… to just get down and do the school and stop with the whining and complaining, because I’m going to have to do it anyway and I always end up doing it so I may as well do it at the beginning and not waste all that time whining and complaining and making it out to be something way worse than it is.

Me

I have said before that I am reading almost all of my eldest daughter’s school books alongside her. Essentially, this year I completed AO7 with her. It was a challenging year for many reasons, but the books, as always, were rich and enjoyable.

Favorite subjects/books
The Pursuit of God by A.W. Tozer and The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges. These were such rich books and I grew so much in my faith. It was a delight to read these alongside A-Age-12 and discuss them with her.

I also loved The Birth of Britain by Winston Churchill, The Brendan Voyage by Tim Severin, Beowulf, and How the Heather Looks by Joan Bodger.

Area that I grew the most in this year
Time management.

Area I need to work on the most
Consistency in training habits. My own and my children.

The most interesting topic in history
Seeing the development of the parliament and laws for the people.

The most interesting topic in science
Without a doubt The Laws of Science (The Secrets of the Universe by Paul Fleisher). It is incredible how perfect and ordered God made this universe. The relativity of time blew our minds.

What was the hardest thing this year?
Managing different personalities living under the same roof who are with each other all. the. time. This has been very sanctifying.

Is there anything that you would change or add?
Because of an amazing friend who speaks fluent Spanish, I am able to add Spanish back into our curriculum again! Very excited about that.

Things you felt did not go well in our homeschool this year
I had tried moving memorizations out of our Morning Time and into each child’s independent work. They were supposed to manage these themselves. Even though I had their memory work clearly printed on their checklists, the children did not consistently work on memory work like they were supposed to. I had attempted to build in accountability by scheduling weekly recitations of the poems and Scriptures they were working on, however, we were so inconsistent with actually doing this that learning new memory work, especially in the last term, fell apart.

I am most proud of
The answers my children gave in this interview! The ability to self evaluate their strengths and weaknesses will be such a valuable skill for them as they go on in life. I had not intentionally set out to teach them that, but through this interview process, I can see that they are learning to do that.

I am pretty good at
Adjusting a lesson on the fly to suit the situation.

Next year I hope to
Be more consistent with our memory work and keeping timelines and notebooks.

Anything else
I can get so down on myself as I think about all the ways I didn’t meet my own expectation for the year, but listening to the children’s thoughtful answers and seeing how much of the school year they enjoyed and grew has been an incredible encouragement. I am thankful to our sovereign God who is over all and through all and in all. Only by His Grace can I continue to raise and educate these amazing, complex, deep-thinking human beings. Soli Deo Gloria.

Half Way Around The World And Back Again


Growing up in Victoria, Australia, I had the opportunity to live among gum trees and wattles, admire the colorful rosellas, and laugh along with the kookaburras who had made their home in my back yard. In my early years, I went to school in the “bush.” The school was an hour from my suburban house, nestled in countryside thick with bushes and trees and lakes and wildlife. In later years, I moved school campuses to a farm boasting an equestrian program and land teeming with life. But I didn’t notice. Preferring to spend my time inside as much as possible, I didn’t pay attention. I didn’t see. I was surrounded by the beauty of God’s creation but spent my childhood with my eyes shut.

Fast forward to 2012. My husband, my then three small children (we now have four), and I moved halfway around the world to Florida, U.S.A. Everything was new and different. I had just discovered Charlotte Mason and Ambleside Online and was beginning to learn about a philosophy that would change my life. I didn’t know then all of her principles, but I had learned enough to know that we should go outside and notice. And there was so much to notice in a new country. The colors were brighter, the flora and fauna were different. We delighted to see squirrels for the first time in our lives! We began to keep Nature Journals. They were not pretty. They were spiraled lined cheap notebooks whose pages would tear easily and get soggy with paint. But they were our first experience of going outside and really seeing. We didn’t know the names for most of what we saw but it didn’t matter. We were looking and we were really seeing. For the first time in my life, my eyes were open. Little did I know that I was building what Charlotte Mason termed a “habit of attention.”

When we went back to visit Australia in 2016, it was as though I was seeing it for the first time. It’s fields, it’s trees, it’s grasses, it’s flowers, it’s hills and cliffs and beaches were captivating. How had I not noticed before? I was struck by how different the color palate was to Florida. Gum trees have smooth grey bark! Who knew? I drew my children’s attention to the kookaburras and magpies, the variety of gum trees and the wattle. I didn’t have a name for everything, but I saw it. We saw it. Our eyes were open. And it was beautiful.

Atmosphere: An Instrument of Education

A Journey Through Charlotte Mason’s 20 Principles: Principle 5a & 6

Last time, I discussed Charlotte Mason’s 4th principle concerning the tools a teacher ought not to use in educating her student. The following four principles, Principles 5-8, discuss the three educational instruments that Mason identifies should be used by a teacher: “atmosphere of environment, the discipline of habit, and the presentation of living ideas.” Today, I am discussing the first of these.

(principle 5a&6) “Therefore, we are limited to three educational instruments–the atmosphere of environment…
When we say that “education is an atmosphere,” we do not mean a child should be isolated in what may be called a ‘child environment’ especially adapted and prepared, but that we should take into account the educational value of his natural home atmosphere, both as regards persons and things, and should let him live freely among his proper conditions. It stultifies a child to bring down his world to the child’s level.”

As I progress through my study of Charlotte Mason’s 20 Principle’s of education, it becomes more apparent to me how interconnected these principles are. Brandy, in her study guide “Start Here,” has helpfully paired the principles to discuss only one at a time, but it must be remembered that they are interconnected, and one does not work in isolation of the others.

Atmosphere of Environment, not Asthetic

To the moms who feel like they do not have it all together in their homes, whose decor hasn’t been updated since they got married because they have been knee-deep in diapers and dinner while teaching a tribe of kids, whose goal has been to just keep everyone alive and fed and happy and educated—be encouraged! When Mason talks about “atmosphere of environment,’ she is not talking about having the Pinterest perfect, spa-like, minimalist oasis that we idolize nowadays on TV and in magazines. In fact, she criticizes what she calls the “Cult of aestheticism” that she saw in her own day. It seems that the idea was that the right color schemes, with the right pictures on the wall, and the right sounds and right “gracious persons” would, by osmosis, furnace in a child a “high soul.” This kind of thinking can deceive us even today. But aesthetics do not a virtuous man make. Let me insert a caveat right here. Having a well organized and aesthetically calm and pleasing physical environment can be helpful in the preparation for learning. If you like a minimalist aesthetic with neutral colored walls and furniture made of natural materials with beautiful artwork on your walls (like I do), go for it. But the carefully constructed physical environment itself does not produce an educated virtuous person and is not required for education to take place.

When Mason talks of the atmosphere of environment she is also not talking about the modern day classroom aesthetic, “especially adapted and prepared,” with the ‘educational’ posters on the wall and primary colored decorations of fake paper trees or birds or fish etc. Mason criticizes the dumbing down of a child’s environment to something artificial then calling it “education.” She saw this as a betrayal of the personhood of the child.

“It is not an environment that these want, a set of artificial relations carefully constructed, but an atmosphere which nobody has been at pains to constitute. It is there, about the child, his natural element, precisely as the atmosphere of the earth is about us.” – Vol 6, p96

So what is Mason talking about? The atmosphere of the home is not primarily concerned with what it looks like. It goes beyond the physical space. It is about relationship.

Atmosphere as Relationship

Mason paints a beautiful picture of Atmosphere, “the natural conditions under which a child should live,” as relationships that a child develops with the people and things around him. It is a lengthy quote but well worth reading in its entirety.

“We all know the natural conditions under which a child should live; how he shares household ways with his mother, romps with his father, is teased by his brothers and petted by his sisters; is taught by his tumbles; learns self-denial by the baby’s needs, the delightfulness of furniture by playing at battle and siege with sofa and table; learns veneration for the old by the visits of his great-grandmother; how to live with his equals by the chums he gathers round him; learns intimacy with animals from his dog and cat; delight in the fields where the buttercups grow and greater delight in the blackberry hedges. And, what tempered ‘fusion of classes’ is so effective as a child’s intimacy with his betters, and also with cook and housemaid, blacksmith and joiner, with everybody who comes in his way? Children have a genius for this sort of general intimacy, a valuable part of their education; care and guidance are needed, of course, lest admiring friends should make fools of them, but no compounded ‘environment’ could make up for this fresh air, this wholesome wind blowing now from one point, now from another.” – Vol 6,p96-97

So, when your house is a mess and your children have all but neglected their math for a week because they have been caring for a sick baby goat who can’t nurse from his mama, you are utilizing the exact tool that Mason says is education. It is not sheltering them from the hard knocks by creating an artificial “child environment,” but cultivating relationships with people and the world so that they grow in virtue through the hard knocks.

It is when you tell your child that they can’t do that activity today because dear Mrs. Smith is not well and you need to bring her a meal and make sure she is ok. Or, when they spend the whole morning in the garage with Grandpa as he shows them his tools, tells them his stories, and has them help him build his latest project. Or when you pray as a family for a church member who has a great need. It is the atmosphere of relationship with the real world that is “fresh air, this wholesome wind blowing now from one point, now from another..”

My son has a play kitchen that he enjoys playing with which satisfies his imagination for a short time. But it by no means fools him to thinking that it is anything like the real thing. He gains much more satisfaction in being in the real kitchen with real running water and a real oven and stove where he can help stir the evening’s meal. He is most satisfied when he knows that he has contributed to the house by helping cook our meal. It is this atmosphere of serving, contributing, and experiencing real life that is most formative. Because they know the difference.

“…no artificial element be introduced, no sprinkling with rose-water, softening with cushions. Children must face life as it is.” Vol 6, p97

Atmosphere as Love and The Common Pursuit of Truth

I have discussed before Mason’s belief that the love of knowledge ought to be the primary motivation for learning. This idea permeates her writings.

“We foresee happy days for children when all teachers know that no other exciting motive whatever is necessary to produce good work in each individual of however big a class than that love of knowledge which is natural to every child” – Vol 6, p98

This atmosphere of the love of learning diverges greatly from our utilitarian culture. Passing a test is now substituted for actual education. But this is a poor facsimile and does not attain to the goal of growing in godliness and virtue. Knowledge itself is worth knowing. Pursuing knowledge for its own sake teaches us to love what is lovely. And ultimately, if we think rightly about the knowledge we are pursuing, it leads us to worship God. He is the Creator of all things. All knowledge comes from Him for His glory. And we, His creatures, should delight in His world and glorify Him because of it.

When books and read-alouds, beautiful music and art, nature walks and enjoying the outdoors are part of your everyday family life; when working hard, diligence, kindness, gentleness, love and thoughtfulness towards others are a common pursuit in the atmosphere of your home; when worship and delight of God are part of the everyday conversation and vocabulary of your home, you are utilizing this powerful instrument afforded to us by our loving Creator: Atmosphere.

“… and this atmosphere in which the child inspires his unconscious ideas of right living emanates from his parents.” – Vol2, p37

Atmosphere is like the fresh air of life. It is not materials and a pretty classroom set up. It is developing relationships with real people in the real world. It is a home where parents have a love for knowledge and seek to grow in knowledge alongside their children.

“The bracing atmosphere of truth and sincerity should be perceived in every School; and here again the common pursuit of knowledge by teacher and class comes to our aid and creates a Current of fresh air perceptible even to the chance visitor, who sees the glow of intellectual life and “moral health on the faces of teachers and children alike.” – Vol 6, p97

 

If you’d like to join me in studying Charlotte Mason’s 20 Principles, get your copy of Start Here and see this post for details

A Journey Through Charlotte Mason 20 Principles Directory

Valderi, Valdera: Reflections on Ambleside Online Camp Meeting

I have just got back from spending a wonderful weekend at Ambleside Online’s 2019 Camp Meeting. On the plane ride home I endeavored to collect my thoughts and process all that I had learned from the conference. But as I attempted to reflect, the folksong, The Happy Wanderer, played over and over in my head. “Valderi, Valdera. Valderi, Valdera, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha…” Over and over and over. When Wendi Capehart taught us that song during the conference, she told us that we would be singing it whether we wanted to or not. She was right. At first, I found it irritating that this unwanted folksong persisted in pervading my thoughts. I wanted to be thinking of deep and meaningful things, not a frivolous folksong. But then I decided that instead of fighting with it, I would embrace it. I could not help but smile and even laugh as the song played round in my head.

You try singing, “…valdera, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha,” without laughing.

Do you know what? Once I embraced it, it was exactly what I needed at that moment. I was smiling, singing a funny song, and enjoying the moment. It reminded me of something that Cindy Rollins said this weekend. Moms need to be joyful. We homeschool moms, who take educating our children very seriously, can easily forget to be joyful in our work. We worry about doing enough. We worry about doing it right. We agonize over all the ways we aren’t living up to “The Perfect.” This weekend Lynn Bruce exhorted us to put away comparing and seeking the perfect Charlotte Mason education. Because there is no perfect education. There is your family’s education. We have these beautiful persons, given to us for such a short while, full of energy and life and wonder, who we forget to smile at because we’re busy looking at what others are doing and thinking we’re not measuring up. We unwittingly push away those organic Valdera, ha, ha, ha,ha,ha moments and miss out on the very joy that is there for us if we allow ourselves to see it.

This work that we are doing is hard, especially when you’re “in the middle” as Sheila Atchley reminded us. But it is joyful work. It is good work. It is kingdom work. We are not raising or educating careers; we are discipling our children and educating their moral imagination. Wendi taught us that through living books our children learn to imagine what it is like to be in someone else’s shoes. They learn to imagine what it is like to be in other cultures, other ways of life. Through living books, our children are developing empathy for the orphan, empathy for the downcast, empathy for the worker in a factory or a leader of a nation. Wendi explained that there was no need for the “goody goody” (as Charlotte Mason calls them) moralizing book that often hardens the hearts of our children instead of softening them. Because living books bring those character qualities worth emulating to the forefront in living, real characters and life situations. As Tim Laurio, from the progeny panel, told us: the characters become their friends who guide them through life. Their failings and successes and even their words of wisdom, set down in the pages of literature, serve as guideposts for life. This is why living books and narration are so integral to Charlotte Mason’s philosophy.

Mason understood the universal law that “Children are born persons.” Karen Glass taught us that this principle as well as “education is the science of relations” were the pillars from which all Mason’s other principles hinge. As Karen went on to explain, these were principles that Mason observed as already existing. She just wrote them down. Anne White said it well when she stated, “Simple principles simply stated are often the best.” Anne showed us that these principles aren’t for the purpose of serving ourselves, they are for the stewardship and service of others. When we realize that Mason’s education philosophy was in order to develop a character that loves God and loves people, we can be joyful in our work. We can smile and be content and hopeful, as Cindy encouraged us to be, because our work is not for us. And it is not for college. It is for others. And most importantly, it is for God. As Cindy reminded us, we are educating our children for the worship of God.

Donna-Jean Breckenridge emphasized that it is not our job to save our children, but to lead them to one who can. Lead them to His Word — His truth. She explained that we do this by being in His Word and praying. Pray, pray, pray, pray, pray because, as Donna-Jean said, “there is a King over ALL” and we can trust Him. He is faithful. And because He is faithful we can be joyful and sing with the Psalmist:

“This is the day that the Lord has made; let us rejoice and be glad in it.” Psalm 118:24

It’s All About the Motivation

“You need to get this work done now! Don’t you know that your future is at stake? If you don’t work hard now, you won’t get a scholarship to the best college, then you won’t get the best job at the best place, and you won’t make lots of money. You don’t want to disappoint me, do you? So memorize these multiplication facts, now!” 

A Journey Through Charlotte Mason’s 20 Principles: Principle 4

“These principles (ie., authority and docility) are limited by the respect due to the personality of children which may not be encroached upon whether by the direct use of fear or love, suggestion or influence, or by undue play upon any one natural desire.”

Throughout Charlotte Mason’s volumes, Mason is highly concerned with the development of character.  From her observations of children, she saw the biggest problem was that they were “incapable of steady effort, because they had no strength of will, no power to make themselves do that which they knew they ought to do.”  As homeschoolers, I think we often see the same problem. The children don’t seem to want to motivate themselves. They don’t have the strength of will to do what they ought to do without reminders and prods and motivation from us. This can be true, not just for children, but for many adults as well. It is comforting to know that Mason saw the same problems and thought long and hard to find a way to help children overcome this fault.

She does this keeping in mind that children are whole people. They have personalities, strengths and weaknesses, and minds capable of great understanding. They are made in the image of God and are to be respected. The personhood of children is not to be undermined or undervalued or encroached upon. It may not be manipulated or coerced. The development of a child’s character as God’s image bearer was of paramount importance to Mason. Children must grow up moral with their affections rightly ordered, and any method employed in the educating of children must not hinder, crush, or maim their character.  It was not worldly success that she saw as the purpose of education, but virtue. This is a classical idea.* Plato said, “Education is teaching our children to desire the right things.” In The Liberal Arts Tradition: A Philosophy of Christian Classical Education, Ravi Jain and Kevin Clark call it piety. Mason realized she was educating people. Not computers. Not factories. People.

Knowledge Is Delectable

Not only did Mason have a high view of children, she had a high view of knowledge. “Knowledge is delectable,” she tells us. Knowledge for its own sake should be the motivation. This is God’s world and we are His creatures — we should want to know. It reminds me of the shorter catechism question, ‘What is the chief end of man?”

The answer:

“Man’s chief end is to glorify God and enjoy him forever.”

This means our purpose is to glorify and delight in God. We delight in Him by delighting in His Word. We also enjoy and glorify God by delighting in His Creation and His people—learning from those who have gone before, the good and the bad, so that our character may grow to be more Christlike so that we may glorify Him.

This, of course, does not come easily. But there is much that we as teachers and parents can do, and NOT do, to lead our children toward desiring knowledge for themselves. It is because of her view of children as persons and the high importance she places on the development of their character as well as their intellect, that Mason’s fourth principle of education places limits on the methods appropriate to educating children.

“we act our parts and play in an unlawful way upon motives.” – Vol 6, p81

How Not to Motivate

Mason warns that any means a teacher might employ to compel a child to do what is required of them that draws their affections and motivations away from knowledge itself, is to be avoided. To compel a child to work by fear (fear of you, punishment, or failure), love (so that they would do anything for you like a pathetic little puppydog), undue influence and suggestion (which I would call manipulation), is to compromise their character so that they become, as Mason says, “flaccid.” In other words, weak.

“Bob or mary is losing that growing time which should make a self-dependent, self-ordered person, and is day by day becoming a parasite who can go only as he is carried, the easy prey of fanatic or demagogue.” – Quoted from For The Children’s Sake, p67

You will get willing obedience by utilizing these means, but at the expense of developing a strong character who can think for themselves and will do what they ought because it is the right thing to do. 

Mason identifies four “natural desires” that are good in their place, being neither good nor bad, but when overemphasized or manipulated, also shift a child’s affection away from knowledge itself. These are:

  • Approbation (approval or praise),
  • Emulation (desire to excel),
  •  Avarice (extreme greed for wealth or material gain), and
  • Ambition.

Each is a good servant, but when one is favored at the expense of others, it is to the detriment of the development of the character of a child.

“We have considered the several desires whose function is to stimulate the mind and save us from that vis inertiae which is our besetting danger. Each such desire has its place but the results are disastrous if any one should dominate.” – Vol 6, p88

Approbation

Praising your child is natural for any parent. They do something well and we say, “great job!” There is no harm in this, as long as you do it “in such a way that no one set of motives be called unduly into play to the injury of the child’s character.” It’s about balance. It becomes a problem when children do the work SO that they get praise or approval. It becomes especially problematic when they desire it from the wrong people or for the wrong things. Praise for virtuous behavior such as hard work is more desirous than praise for achievements. One of my daughters qualified to take the DukeTIP this year (this means she placed in the 95th percentile or higher in last year’s standardized test and can take the college entrance SAT along with high schoolers). It is tempting to praise her for high academic abilities. But really, she was born with a keen mind, which she had absolutely no control over. Yes, a Charlotte Mason education of reading living books and narration went a long way to help her to place well, but it is her character qualities of diligence and hard work that are worthy to be praised, more than the achievement itself. I have other daughters who work just as hard and have received the same education, that will not, in all likelihood, qualify for DukeTIP. They were not created with the same academic abilities (more to the point, our current education system tests only a certain kind of ability, but I digress). But they are equally hardworking. When children begin to work for approval, instead of the knowledge itself, it is at the expense of character. Too much praise and of the wrong thing can cause a child to become conceited, which is a definite blight to a person’s character.

Emulation

When high test scores become the goal of education, the child no longer cares what it is he is learning. He crams for the exam to get the marks, only to promptly forget a short time after. Mason was highly critical of the trend she saw in schools of her day where the desire to excel was manipulated by the school system through prizes and rewards to get results.

“Emulation, the desire of excelling, works wonders in the hands of the schoolmaster; and, indeed, this natural desire is an amazing spur to effort, both intellectual and moral…
…In the intellectual field, however, there is danger; and nothing worse could have happened to our schools than the system of marks, prizes, place-taking, by which many of them are practically governed. A boy is so taken up with the desire to forge “ahead that there is no time to think of anything else. What he learns is not interesting to him; he works to get his remove.” – Vol 6. p85

What has a child gained by getting a good score if they don’t care about the knowledge that they scored high in?

Competitive Examinations aren’t helpful because the motivation isn’t knowledge. It is the “getting on”, achieving scholarships and the like. It doesn’t make them a better person.

Avarice

Closely connected with Emulation, is Avarice. When greed for wealth or material gain is played upon as a motivation for children to do their work, then we have a big problem. What happens to the child who works so that they can get good grades so they can get a scholarship, so they can go to the best college and get the best job so they can have lots of money and the best car and live on the best street… You get my point.  Having these things is not the problem. It is the unhealthy desire for them as the motivation for doing what ought to be done that is the problem. Where is the love of learning? Where is the love of doing the right thing because it’s the right thing?  Where is the human?

Ambition

Ambition hardly needs to be discussed. I think most of us know the difference between Ambition as a servant, that keeps us from stagnation, and Ambition as a master, which is an all-consuming tyrant.

Mason does not say that these “natural desires” are bad in and of themselves. They are good servants when in their place. It is when they are out of balance that it can be a detriment to character.

“… because the balance of character is destroyed by the constant stimulation of this one desire at the expense of the rest.” – Vol 2, p221

Mason’s goal is to see children self-dependent and self-ordered, who grow to love what is lovely and pursue what is good for themselves and for its own sake.

The coming principles will address what can be done toward that ideal, but for now, let me suggest that it is through gentle leading, not coercing, that we guide our children to delight in knowledge—because “knowledge is delectable.”

 

If you’d like to join me in studying Charlotte Mason’s 20 Principles, get your copy of Start Here and see this post for details

A Journey Through Charlotte Mason 20 Principles Directory

*For more on Education as a virtue, I really like this post by Mystie Winkler.

Older posts

© 2019 Mum To Mom

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑