Mum To Mom

Musings of an Aussie Mother Living in the USA

We Have Chicks!

Recently we had the wonderful opportunity to hatch some chicken eggs.

A friend of a friend (who we know as the “Chicken Whisperer”) had a compact incubator that they graciously offered to us to borrow. It can hold up to seven eggs, and the “Chicken Whisperer” gave us the eggs to incubate. The time and temperature had already been set for 21 days and 99.5°F, so we were good to go.

We took them home, put the eggs in the incubator, plugged it in, and then watched and waited.

Eggs Incubating

Sadly, there was an altercation involving a vacuum and some clumsy legs that resulted in our first lot of eggs getting smashed a week into the process. Yeah … that was messy.

We were all so devastated.

But the “Chicken Whisperer” graciously gave us another lot of eggs so we could have another go. Needless to say, these were kept in a more secure location in the laundry. We tracked the process in the kids’ science notebooks.

We candled the eggs at 2 weeks to see which eggs were developing. These aren’t the best photos, but you can make out the red veins across the bottom of the egg in the first pic. the dark section above the veins and air pocket is the embryo.


You can see the air pocket at the bottom of these eggs.

We had two eggs where nothing happened. We removed them at this stage. There were two others that developed the air sack but looked a lot gooey-er inside than the others. The “Chicken Whisperer” told us that the embryo could be hiding in the center of the egg, so we left them in the incubator to see what would happen.

A couple of days before hatching, my youngest daughter and I heard chirping from inside one of the eggs. Excitement!!!

At 7.40pm on Tuesday, we were sitting in the lounge room listening to Daddy read a story when we heard a loud chirp. Jumping up, we immediately headed to the laundry to see what was happening. Sure enough, there were two little beaks poking out of cracks in the shell of the eggs.

The First Crack

We waited expectantly. For 40 minutes the chicks were noisily working at the crack but they made little progress. We realized that this could take awhile. As it was a school night, we sent the girls to bed promising them that we would wake them up when the chicks were going to hatch.

At 11pm, the shell of one of the eggs cracked around the middle. Bursting into the girls rooms, turning lights on, shaking them awake, I yelled, “It’s time! It’s happening! Get up, quick!!!!!!!!”

In a state of panic the girls emerged from their beds, trying to make sense of the excitement.

We got to the laundry and watched this.

Flash Hatching

Flash Hatching

Absolutely amazing.

We watched for a little while, but the second chick was taking her time so we all went to bed and found her out and about the next morning.

Aren’t they cute? The golden chick is an Orpington. My eldest daughter named her Perriwinkle. The black one (we think) is a Silky. The younger two girls named her Flash. The girls were fascinated by the hair on Flash’s feet. They were also amazed that when they blink, their eyelids close from the bottom up. The girls thought this was very cool.

In a month or so, when the chicks have grown and their feathers have come in, we will give the chickens back to the “Chicken Whisperer.”

Perriwinkle

Perriwinkle

Flash

Flash

1 Comment

  1. Awesome! Those are the healthiest chicks I have ever seen when you gave them back to The Chicken Whisperer! I love your blog!

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